Publications


Printmaking in the Service of Botany

Printmaking in the Service of Botany

By Gavin D. R. Bridson and Donald E. Wendel with the assistance of James J. White. 1986. 166 pp.; 41 col., 199 b&w figs.; 8 x 10 1/2"; 2 lbs. Embossed stiff paper cover, Out-of-print. ISBN 0-913196-49-5.


Gavin Bridson, bibliographer at the Hunt Institute, explains in the introduction that before printmaking the main problem for artists was distributing botanical drawings so that botanists everywhere could study them. Bridson goes on to trace the history of printing methods for botanical illustrations through five centuries. With the aid of photographic enlargement of details in a one to one ratio, 72 examples of relief, intaglio, planographic, nature-prints and photographic printing techniques are analyzed in this catalogue that accompanied a 1986 exhibition. When paired with American Botanical Prints of Two Centuries, together these catalogues explore the history of botanical printmaking in Europe and America and explain the various printmaking techniques.


Lavatère a grandes fleurs/Lavatera trimestris. L., stipple engraving by Louis Charles Ruotte (1754-ca.1806) after a drawing by Gerard van Spaendonck (1746-1822) for his Fleurs Dessinées d'après Nature (Paris, 1801). This full-page illustration was printed in black ink (no platemark visible) on laid paper. The plate printer is unknown.


Publications




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